Wanna Introduce A Film On Turner Classic Movies?

Now at Your Library: Streaming Movies, Music

A link has been sent to your friend’s email address. Join the Nation’s Conversation To find out more about Facebook commenting please read the Conversation Guidelines and FAQs Wanna introduce a film on Turner Classic Movies? Whitney Matheson, USA TODAY 1:16 p.m. EDT October 2, 2013 A new contest will let a Turner Classic Movies fan co-host a film with Robert Osborne. (Photo: TCM) SHARE 29 CONNECT 12 TWEET COMMENTEMAILMORE If I watch a classic film on Turner Classic Movies, I make sure to catch Robert Osborne’s insightful introductions and postscripts. More often than not, he tells me something I didn’t know, and that even goes for movies I’ve seen dozens of times (like, say, The Graduate). This month, TCM is holding a contest that will let one lucky fan co-host a movie with Osborne. Over at the site for its ” Ultimate Fan Contest ,” you can submit a 90-second video of yourself introducing a classic film. Along with being featured on the air, the grand-prize winner will win a trip to the 2014 TCM Classic Film Festival in Hollywood, where he/she also will introduce a film. The contest just kicked off, so few submissions have been posted on the site. However, this clever sample sets the standard for what they’re looking for.

Why Do We Eat Popcorn at the Movies?

Libraries are “meeting patrons where they want to access content,” said Kirk Blankenship, Electronic Resources Librarian for Seattle Public Libraries, which is using the service called Hoopla. The service, from Ohio-based Midwest Tape, LLC, is also being used in Los Angeles, Salt Lake City, Topeka, Kan., and several others towns and cities nationwide. Hoopla launched in full in May with 20 library systems. As of early September, there are about 220,000 people using the app, said Michael Manon, Hoopla’s brand manager. The goal is to reach 100 library systems by year’s end. Libraries have always been a source of audiovisual entertainment. A 2012 Pew Research Center survey found that among patrons 16 years old and older, 40 percent visited libraries to borrow movies. Another 16 percent borrowed music. In the Seattle area, DVDs and CDs of popular titles can have queues of hundreds of people waiting to check them out. E-books have been offered for years now. “Public libraries do not have the budgets to compete with Amazon, Comcast, and Netflix and will not be able to pay a premium for online content,” Blankenship said, adding that DVDs will continue to be the best way to offer popular movies. Updating and maintaining that physical collection takes time and money. It also means libraries have to pay for the media upfront, while Hoopla allows them to pay per time a title is borrowed. Those costs depend on the type of media and its release date, and range from 99 cents to $2.99.

Popcorna name mostly associated with puffed kernels of cornis actually a strain of corn, characterized by especially starchy kernels with hard kernel walls, which help internal pressure build when placed over heat. It was one of the first variations of maize cultivated in Central America. Popcorn went north and it went south, but as far as I can see, it really only survived in South America, says Andrew Smith, author of Popped Culture: A Social History of Popcorn . Eventually, trade and commerce brought the unique kernels northward. Most likely, North American whalers went to Chile, found varieties of popcorn, picked them up and thought that they were cute, and brought them back to New England in the early 19th century, Smith explains. After popcorn made its way to the eastern part of North America, it spread rapidly. Eaters found the act of popping corn wildly entertaining , and by 1848, popcorn, the snack food, was prevalent enough to be included in the Dictionary of Americanisms. Popcorn had literally exploded onto the scene and was available everywhereespecially at entertainment sites like circuses and fairs. In fact, there was really only one entertainment site where the snack was absent: the theaters. One reason for popcorns increasing popularity was its mobility: in 1885, the first steam-powered popcorn maker hit the streets, invented by Charles Cretor . The mobile nature of the machine made it the perfect production machine for serving patrons attending outdoor sporting events, or circuses and fairs.