Rallying-rally Of France Leg 2 Classification

Paul Casey and David Lynn beat Miguel Angel Jimenez and Matteo Manassero by a hole to even the contest. The tournament ends on Sunday with 10 singles. Each team needs 5 1/2 more points for victory. Continental Europe lost the last six meetings and is trying to win the trophy for the first time since the inaugural contest in 2000. After two days of fourballs, Continental Europe was leading 5 1/2-4 1/2. On Saturday morning, Nicolas Colsaerts and Gonzalo Fernandez-Castano halved their match with Stephen Gallacher and Paul Lawrie. The Scottish duo was three down after eight holes, but birdied Nos. 16 and 17. Fernandez-Castano missed the winning putt from 10 feet on the last hole. Joost Luiten and Gregory Bourdy birdied their last three holes to beat Jamie Donaldson and Marc Warren 2 and 1. Chris Wood and Scott Jamieson combined for six birdies to defeat Thorbjorn Olesen and Francesco Molinari 2 and 1.

Syrian refugees end protest in France

Jari-Matti Latvala (Finland) Volkswagen 2:18:58.300 2. Daniel Sordo (Spain) Citroen +00:00.400 3. Sebastien Ogier (France) Volkswagen 00:01.500 4. Sebastien Loeb (France) Citroen 00:05.000 5. Thierry Neuville (Belgium) Ford 01:10.400 6. Evgeny Novikov (Russia) Ford 02:16.400 7. Mikko Hirvonen (Finland) Citroen 02:43.100 8. Mads Ostberg (Norway) Ford 02:57.200 9. Andreas Mikkelsen (Norway) Volkswagen 03:19.200 10. Martin Prokop (Czech Republic) Ford 05:25.200

France military eyes 2014 cuts, far-right seeks to benefit

Credit: Reuters/Christian Hartmann By John Irish and Emmanuel Jarry PARIS | Thu Oct 3, 2013 8:21am EDT PARIS (Reuters) – France’s military will cut about 7,500 jobs next year, a defense ministry source said on Thursday, detailing government belt-tightening plans that the far-right hopes will deliver it votes at municipal elections in 2014. The cuts come as tensions rise within Socialist President Francois Hollande’s 17-month-old coalition, whose poll ratings have fallen to 23 percent due to dissatisfaction about the economy and jobs. The defense ministry said in April that 34,000 jobs would likely be cut over the coming six years, but its overall budget would remain largely static, steering clear of drastic spending cuts after military officials and lawmakers said that would reduce France’s ability to counter global security threats. “Given the six year objectives, (the cut) should be around 7,000 to 7,500 military and civilian personnel in 2014,” the source said on condition of anonymity, ahead of a news conference by Defence Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian. A handful of bases will be closed or restructured, including an 800-man regiment in the town of Orange in the Vaucluse department, where support for the anti-immigrant, anti-European Union National Front is strong, the source said. Marion Marechal-Le Pen, a National Front member of parliament for Vaucluse, said the cuts would hurt France’s defenses and local economies in areas like hers. “I can only worry about the immediate economic impact in a region that has already been heavily hit by unemployment and economic difficulties,” she said, reacting to media reports about the cuts. “The governments of the right and the left have preferred to sell off our military know-how and lose our diplomatic independence by making small short-term savings. That will cost France’s sovereignty dearly in the coming years,” she said. France’s military employs some 228,000 personnel today. A further 165,000 individuals are employed by the defence industry, not including sub-contractors. The government plans 15 billion euros ($20 billion) in savings next year and 3 billion extra revenues from higher taxes and fighting tax evasion to reduce the budget deficit. (Editing by Tom Heneghan and Robin Pomeroy)

5, 2013 at 3:22 PM CALAIS, France, Oct. 5 (UPI) — A group of 60 Syrian nationals seeking asylum in Britain ended their protest in a French port after being denied passage, officials said. Members of the group had said they thought they wanted to settle in France but since arriving, they’ve been treated “worse than animals” with French police targeting them and being forced to live outside. After their treatment in France, the group stated they wanted to go to Britain but the British government denied them passage to seek asylum after taking over a ferry staging area in Calais since Wednesday, Skynet News said Saturday. British officials said they would consider individual requests for asylum but refused to take the group of 60 refugees together. Two members of the group climbed to the roof of the building and threatened to jump if their demands weren’t met. Another 20 were said to be on a hunger strike, officials said. In the end, the group dispersed peacefully. French officials said they would fast-track their asylum applications after the protest began but were rebuffed. Now, French police said, they suspect the individuals will live on the streets illegally and may eventually seek safe passage to Britain as undocumented aliens. Though France has said it would accept Syrian refugees looking for political asylum, only about 850 applicants of the hundreds of thousands of displaced Syrians have gone there, the United Nations said.